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A great deal has been written over the years about the viability of moving a hotel’s property-management system (PMS) to the cloud to take advantage of the latest technologies, but hoteliers need to realize that it’s not the only viable option. All platforms have advantages, including self-hosted, private cloud and on-premise solutions that leverage the latest mobile, contact free and web-based technologies. Independent operators can still enhance the digital guest experience, support personalized and mobile check-in, deploy contact free technologies, and secure hotel/guest data even if their PMS does not reside in the cloud. It should not be a question of “Cloud or On Premise?” but rather “Does the PMS solve your business objectives in both technology and service?”

Much has been written in the mainstream hospitality press about the challenges COVID-19 has presented to the industry. Hotels are in more pain than at any time in our memories. Because of the extensive media coverage, I won’t dwell on this topic further in what is primarily a technology column. But it’s the background for this week’s column, and so merits acknowledgement.

Are You All In?
Posted: 07/27/2020

Imagine everyone in your organization engaged, aligned, and performing to their potential. Imagine everyone playing “All In.”

Great organizations have synergy. Their culture allows them to play to a rhythm at a different tempo than the average organization. How do you get that at your organization?

Many front-line hospitality workers rely on tips for a significant part of their paychecks. If not for tips, many hotel associates who serve as waitstaff, bartenders, housekeepers, bell staff, concierges and pool attendants would soon be looking for other jobs. This is a regional issue: in most of Asia and Europe, staff get higher base pay, and tips are either not expected at all, or are truly discretionary. But in the U.S., Canada, Britain and other countries, tips are an important reality, and one that’s not likely to change anytime soon.

As somebody who’s helped to grow a company from 13 people to nearly a thousand, I know very well the excitement that comes with having a mindset focused entirely on growth. Every newly acquired customer, every new office and every milestone means the gap between you and your nearest competitor is that much bigger and that much harder to overtake.



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Checking In before Checking Out

12/19/2016
by Scott Schaedle

Today, nearly 60 percent of travelers book hotels using a mobile device and 81 percent find user reviews important. With mobile devices serving as a natural extension of travelers, hotels must engage with their guests where they’re talking and listening before, during and after their stay to manage the guest experience from check-in to checkout. 

Streamline Operations
Before a guest even steps foot onto the property, hotels should incorporate mobile technology into their internal operations to streamline communication between departments and shifts. Replacing physical logbooks and finicky radios with mobile devices is one way to ensure transparency and accountability between frontline employees and management, shaping the guest’s first impression and ensuring consistency from day to day.

Encourage Engagement
Once checked in, guests should have a way to communicate requests and complaints directly to hotel staff via mobile device without being required to download an app or call the front desk. Requesting more towels or expressing a noise complaint via text encourages guests to engage directly with staff in a manner that is intuitive and natural for today’s traveler. Opening this additional line of communication between the guest and staff not only creates a highly personalized guest experience, it also provides the opportunity for management to address an issue that might otherwise only be discovered after the guest checks out and publishes a review.

It is imperative that mobile-initiated complaints are escalated quickly, handled appropriately and logged correctly. While a complaint may have been initiated via text, hotel management should not necessarily continue the dialogue using the same medium. Instead, the manager should quickly take the complaint offline by engaging with the guest verbally or face-to-face. After the issue is remedied, the incident should be logged so that staff can be aware of and sensitive to the guest’s issue during future stays. 

Keep it Simple
If technology overcomplicates the guest experience, don’t implement it. Completely replacing traditional staples in the hospitality industry like the front desk associate or housekeeper with technology removes the opportunity to personally connect with guests and create the highly customized experience we’ve all come to expect.

While comment cards on pillows might be obsolete, the concept is certainly not. Hotels should automatically send a brief survey to the guest’s mobile device after checkout requesting feedback on their experience. Many hotels offer points as incentives to completing these surveys, which ultimately provides a wealth of information to calibrate operations and increase guest satisfaction.

While we most certainly have not seen the extent of mobile technology’s role in the hospitality industry, it’s clear that hotels seeking to increase customer satisfaction must connect with guests where they’re engaged through mobile technology. Through technology, savvy hotels should proactively shape the guest experience by streamlining internal operations, opening a new line of communication and implementing technology where it makes sense.

About The Author
Scott Schaedle
Founder and President
Quore


Scott Schaedle founded Quore in 2012 after identifying the need for and creating a solution to revolutionize and streamline hotel operations. Raised in a family rooted in the hospitality industry, Schaedle grew up and worked in hotels his entire life. Schaedle is the driving force behind the vision of the company and designed Quore through a collaboration between hoteliers, designers and software developers. Under his leadership, Quore now has more than 20,000 users at more than 1,000 hotels, including properties in leading management companies throughout the country.

 
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