Tech Talk

Recent posts

People today expect to be connected always and everywhere; sometimes it’s hard to believe that there was a world before smartphones and Wi-Fi. In the time since Wi-Fi became ubiquitous in hotels, apartments, and public spaces, it has fueled the evolution of connectivity in a lot of ways. Just like Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, the most basic needs start at the bottom, and you can’t get to the next level without a strong foundation. 

By now, everyone is aware that hotel giant Marriott International announced on Friday a massive data breach that goes back more than four years and may have affected up to 500 million customers worldwide. 

After two years of preparation, the FlyZoo Hotel — a futuristic property that uses interactive technologies to do everything from greet guests to deliver room service — is ready for business. 

Mobile technology is fast becoming central to the entire travel experience. Consumers are increasingly using their smartphones to research trips, book accommodation, check in at the airport, and access their hotel room. But one of the next big roles mobile has to play in the travel process is mobile payment. The idea of an entirely cashless society might still seem some way off, but mobile payment is gaining popularity. As it becomes more widely used, its fast and frictionless nature will bring benefits before, during and after a trip. 

Digital marketing, also known as internet marketing, plays a significant role to boost hotel website traffic and online bookings. Recently, many big announcements were made in the digital industry, for example when Facebook introduced a new video format for marketers, or when Google announced a board core algorithm. If you are a new hotelier and want to stay ahead in the industry, then you should know what’s going on in the hotel digital marketing industry. 
 



want to read more articles like this?

want to read more articles like this?

Sign up to receive our twice-a-month Watercooler and Siegel Sez Newsletters and never miss another article or news story.

x
 

Loyalty – Do your Travel Providers Have What It Takes?

02/10/2015

One of the biggest hooks in travel and tourism is the loyalty program. It’s a godsend to a modern marketing department that understands that nothing fuels the love a consumer feels for the consumed like something for nothing.

Loyalty-based marketing is a sure winner based on the universal principles of personal greed and self-serving gratification. The basic idea is to give people a reward for doing things they were going to do anyway – like travel, eat, drink and sleep. Rewards bring pleasure and frankly, our primal brains are suckers for pleasure. The marketing department has learned the lesson taught by famed behavioral psychologist B.F. Skinner and his little rodent buddies: light up the brain’s pleasure center and the rats in the box will pump that revenue lever until their little paws fall off. 

So are you hooked?
 
It may seem like a no-brainer but there is a lot of yin and yang about loyalty programs that I’d really like to explore for Hospitality Upgrade. First, I’m curious about how loyalty club members travel with reward cards. Is it a casual thing for you, a nice-but-no-big-deal perk?  Or is collecting your points the focal point around which you plan your trip?

A business acquaintance of mine is a living master of the point bank. His simple philosophy: elite airline status first, business objectives – oh, you know, maybe second or third.  It was from him that I learned that if you add two or three unnecessary cities between yourself and your ultimate destination, you may blow the afternoon flying but you’ll have plenty of trip segments to show for your efforts. This something-for-nothing stratagem isn’t always as easy as it looks, and sometimes requires you to enter first class quickly with your head down and your sunglasses on – no photographs, please.   

Does one set of points matter more to you than another? Are you devoted to an airline and so-so about the hotel accommodations?  Do you hop any available flight at hand but always make sure that your home-away-from-home hotel is available before you hit the road?      

And now to that embarrassing little matter of the finances. I do know people who actually pay for their transportation and accommodation when they travel, but they’re definitely 'one percenters' – the very wealthiest of the traveling public. I would contend that the majority – if not the vast majority – of reward points are not purchased by the business travelers in whose accounts they reside, but by their employers. 

I’m beginning to wonder if loyalty club marketing departments are actually pandering to the proper recipient. Doesn’t it make more sense to get the company to pick a provider, work out a volume/discount exchange, and then incent, influence or downright instruct the individual traveler’s participation? Their reward is the reward points and program perks they covet... or learn to live with.  Admire the individual travelers and thank them kindly for their business, but when it comes to the payout, you gotta love the bill payers.

Do you like the service you get from your rewards program? Do you feel welcomed, cherished and pampered?  Are you there for the recognition and special treatment or do you tolerate the mediocrity for the sake of your point balance? Are your points the only thank you that you get for being a road warrior or does having special status open a world that makes it all seem worthwhile?

Finally, the point of all this generous point endowment is self-evident: you are a marketing target with a giant bull’s eye on your back. I hear from my clubs every 45 minutes or so, tempting me with offers of escapism and adventure. Are you content with your participation in a never-ending barrage of email and solicitation, or is it simply the price we pay to do business in the electronic age?       

Feedback time! Send an email to me at michaelschubach@me.com. Tell me your loyalty story, share your loyalty motivation and confess the guilt you feel when you use points to fly off to the Bahamas, use points to pay for your beachside hotel and then call in fat on Monday morning to the company that paid for all your point-earning adventures. Tell me if I can share your comments by name – either in a magazine article or FB comment – or if you revel in your anonymity, like my frequently flying business associate. 

About The Author
Michael Schubach




Michael Schubach is a regular contributor to Hospitality Upgrade.

 
Comments
Blog post currently doesn't have any comments.
Leave comment



 Security code