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A groundbreaking new report by the Urban Land Institute in Washington, D.C. explores sustainability in the hospitality industry and examines ways in which hotels are incorporating eco-friendly best practices into both operations and construction. The study includes insights from leading hotel owners, developers and investors.

Every hotel owner wants to know how he can increase the traffic to the website, and at the same time, boost direct bookings. The key to accomplish both the objectives is to design a site that is accessible even to disabled people. It will not only improve the usability for all types of visitors, but it will also improve your market penetration. Designing ADA website is also very imperative to prevent legitimate complications. In addition to this, an ADA feature will aid in improving the website performance in search engines.

The underappreciated city of Minneapolis served as host for the 2019 edition of HITEC (produced by HFTP) which wrapped up its most recent four-day run on June 20, 2019. In the days and weeks leading up to the event, meeting solicitations and party invites filled my inbox at a growth rate any VC or entrepreneur would envy. As a first-timer to this international hospitality technology behemoth, it became apparent that HITEC actually begins a few weeks prior to when that first request or invitation lands in your over-stuffed inbox.

Time is limited. Once it’s gone, you can’t gain it back. Similarly, once a room goes unsold for a night, it will go unsold forever. There’s no way to recover that loss, because there’s no way to go back in time.
 
Many hotels fight this limitation by trying to sell as many rooms as possible. If all the rooms are completely booked, time no longer becomes a factor. But most don’t have the luxury of being at-capacity every single night. That’s why last-minute booking apps are growing in popularity in the industry, where hotels can make the most of each day. These apps specifically target guests who don’t plan far in advance, seeking accommodations from one week to one minute later.
 
There are several different ways your hotel can benefit from using last-minute booking apps in your business strategy.

IoT is Coming, Jon Snow…
Posted: 05/21/2019

Hospitality is prime for the coming advent of the various devices that make up the Internet of Things. Estimates show the industry now represents 17.5 million rooms worldwide and savvy guests are demanding more personalization and an overall improved guest experience along their connected travel journey and belief is that IoT can bring this to reality. 



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Loyalty – Do your Travel Providers Have What It Takes?

02/10/2015

One of the biggest hooks in travel and tourism is the loyalty program. It’s a godsend to a modern marketing department that understands that nothing fuels the love a consumer feels for the consumed like something for nothing.

Loyalty-based marketing is a sure winner based on the universal principles of personal greed and self-serving gratification. The basic idea is to give people a reward for doing things they were going to do anyway – like travel, eat, drink and sleep. Rewards bring pleasure and frankly, our primal brains are suckers for pleasure. The marketing department has learned the lesson taught by famed behavioral psychologist B.F. Skinner and his little rodent buddies: light up the brain’s pleasure center and the rats in the box will pump that revenue lever until their little paws fall off. 

So are you hooked?
 
It may seem like a no-brainer but there is a lot of yin and yang about loyalty programs that I’d really like to explore for Hospitality Upgrade. First, I’m curious about how loyalty club members travel with reward cards. Is it a casual thing for you, a nice-but-no-big-deal perk?  Or is collecting your points the focal point around which you plan your trip?

A business acquaintance of mine is a living master of the point bank. His simple philosophy: elite airline status first, business objectives – oh, you know, maybe second or third.  It was from him that I learned that if you add two or three unnecessary cities between yourself and your ultimate destination, you may blow the afternoon flying but you’ll have plenty of trip segments to show for your efforts. This something-for-nothing stratagem isn’t always as easy as it looks, and sometimes requires you to enter first class quickly with your head down and your sunglasses on – no photographs, please.   

Does one set of points matter more to you than another? Are you devoted to an airline and so-so about the hotel accommodations?  Do you hop any available flight at hand but always make sure that your home-away-from-home hotel is available before you hit the road?      

And now to that embarrassing little matter of the finances. I do know people who actually pay for their transportation and accommodation when they travel, but they’re definitely 'one percenters' – the very wealthiest of the traveling public. I would contend that the majority – if not the vast majority – of reward points are not purchased by the business travelers in whose accounts they reside, but by their employers. 

I’m beginning to wonder if loyalty club marketing departments are actually pandering to the proper recipient. Doesn’t it make more sense to get the company to pick a provider, work out a volume/discount exchange, and then incent, influence or downright instruct the individual traveler’s participation? Their reward is the reward points and program perks they covet... or learn to live with.  Admire the individual travelers and thank them kindly for their business, but when it comes to the payout, you gotta love the bill payers.

Do you like the service you get from your rewards program? Do you feel welcomed, cherished and pampered?  Are you there for the recognition and special treatment or do you tolerate the mediocrity for the sake of your point balance? Are your points the only thank you that you get for being a road warrior or does having special status open a world that makes it all seem worthwhile?

Finally, the point of all this generous point endowment is self-evident: you are a marketing target with a giant bull’s eye on your back. I hear from my clubs every 45 minutes or so, tempting me with offers of escapism and adventure. Are you content with your participation in a never-ending barrage of email and solicitation, or is it simply the price we pay to do business in the electronic age?       

Feedback time! Send an email to me at michaelschubach@me.com. Tell me your loyalty story, share your loyalty motivation and confess the guilt you feel when you use points to fly off to the Bahamas, use points to pay for your beachside hotel and then call in fat on Monday morning to the company that paid for all your point-earning adventures. Tell me if I can share your comments by name – either in a magazine article or FB comment – or if you revel in your anonymity, like my frequently flying business associate. 

About The Author
Michael Schubach




Michael Schubach is a regular contributor to Hospitality Upgrade.

 
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