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A great deal has been written over the years about the viability of moving a hotel’s property-management system (PMS) to the cloud to take advantage of the latest technologies, but hoteliers need to realize that it’s not the only viable option. All platforms have advantages, including self-hosted, private cloud and on-premise solutions that leverage the latest mobile, contact free and web-based technologies. Independent operators can still enhance the digital guest experience, support personalized and mobile check-in, deploy contact free technologies, and secure hotel/guest data even if their PMS does not reside in the cloud. It should not be a question of “Cloud or On Premise?” but rather “Does the PMS solve your business objectives in both technology and service?”

Much has been written in the mainstream hospitality press about the challenges COVID-19 has presented to the industry. Hotels are in more pain than at any time in our memories. Because of the extensive media coverage, I won’t dwell on this topic further in what is primarily a technology column. But it’s the background for this week’s column, and so merits acknowledgement.

Are You All In?
Posted: 07/27/2020

Imagine everyone in your organization engaged, aligned, and performing to their potential. Imagine everyone playing “All In.”

Great organizations have synergy. Their culture allows them to play to a rhythm at a different tempo than the average organization. How do you get that at your organization?

Many front-line hospitality workers rely on tips for a significant part of their paychecks. If not for tips, many hotel associates who serve as waitstaff, bartenders, housekeepers, bell staff, concierges and pool attendants would soon be looking for other jobs. This is a regional issue: in most of Asia and Europe, staff get higher base pay, and tips are either not expected at all, or are truly discretionary. But in the U.S., Canada, Britain and other countries, tips are an important reality, and one that’s not likely to change anytime soon.

As somebody who’s helped to grow a company from 13 people to nearly a thousand, I know very well the excitement that comes with having a mindset focused entirely on growth. Every newly acquired customer, every new office and every milestone means the gap between you and your nearest competitor is that much bigger and that much harder to overtake.



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Move Fast and Break Things

07/03/2014
by Geneva Rinehart
Even days after the close of #HITEC2014 in Los Angeles I’m still recounting the details of this tremendous industry event and takeaways that I will use in the workplace. My mind continues to download information, insights and new connections to my network.
 
I know that there were many of my respected colleagues who have shared their thoughts from last week. I look forward to reading these blogs once I get my email inbox back under control. When I was asked what I thought of HITEC 2014 there was one thing that immediately came to mind: Move Fast and Break Things.This phrase was borrowed from the offices at Facebook. There is a part two to this motto: What would you do if you were not afraid?, to which there is an arrow pointing back to Move Fast and Break Things. This is defining.
 
If you missed the Tuesday morning session with Rachel Botsman you probably have missed the best session ever at HITEC. Yes, I said ever. I won’t even try to bring a summary of this fantastic, enlightening and inspiring message but I will share this: in today’s world it is the old way of thinking that will get you into trouble. For example, the old thinking had a 12-month timeline for research, discovery, planning and implementation. In the year 2014 that is not a luxury any company can afford. If you aren’t making decisions quickly you will find you are wasting time spinning wheels and are destined to repeat your steps. Technology moves too quickly. Being quick doesn’t mean being careless, but rather thorough and decisive.
 
Technology is outpacing regulation and legislation. You don’t have to look far to find Airbnb, Uber and Lyft. These companies, and more importantly these ideas, are disrupting the established communities. While it took Hilton Hotels more than 90 years to reach a number of available guestrooms upwards of 610,000, Airbnb surpassed this number of available guestrooms in just four.
 
The success of an idea or a company in 2014 relies on realizing a friction point and resolving it. Botsman said, “Once the public decides there is a new way and the new way is better, there is no way to reverse.” No one wants to be the Eastman Kodak of the hospitality industry.
 
At this juncture, there are only three choices a company can make: Put the proverbial head in the sand, fight or pioneer and embrace the change as an opportunity.
 
It’s the end of the world as we know it. Understanding this disruption, the momentum and ideas that it brings with it will define your work in 2014. This clarity might help you Move Fast and Break Things. And I am hoping you won’t be afraid to try.
 
 
 
Slides from Rachel's presentation are available at Collaborative Consumption

I greatly enjoyed the session by Rachel Botsman and I hope that HFTP will release a stream of this session so I can watch it again!
About The Author
Geneva Rinehart
SVP, Managing Editor
Hospitality Upgrade


Geneva Rinehart is the managing editor at Hospitality Upgrade. For two decades, she has followed the world of hospitality technology. On occasion she will chronicle hospitality technology issues, technology trends, and new technologies for Hospitality Upgrade on LinkedIn and Twitter: @genevarinehart

 
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