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Time is limited. Once it’s gone, you can’t gain it back. Similarly, once a room goes unsold for a night, it will go unsold forever. There’s no way to recover that loss, because there’s no way to go back in time.
 
Many hotels fight this limitation by trying to sell as many rooms as possible. If all the rooms are completely booked, time no longer becomes a factor. But most don’t have the luxury of being at-capacity every single night. That’s why last-minute booking apps are growing in popularity in the industry, where hotels can make the most of each day. These apps specifically target guests who don’t plan far in advance, seeking accommodations from one week to one minute later.
 
There are several different ways your hotel can benefit from using last-minute booking apps in your business strategy.

IoT is Coming, Jon Snow…
Posted: 05/21/2019

Hospitality is prime for the coming advent of the various devices that make up the Internet of Things. Estimates show the industry now represents 17.5 million rooms worldwide and savvy guests are demanding more personalization and an overall improved guest experience along their connected travel journey and belief is that IoT can bring this to reality. 

The forces driving local search rankings are constantly changing. But recent studies suggest that in 2019, four key factors make up the local search algorithm. 
 
The most significant factor is Google My Business (GMB). If you’re not on it, get on it now.

The robotic revolution in the hospitality industry might seem to have taken a step back. This January, the famously quirky Henn-Na Hotel in Japan fired half of its 243 robot staff. The robotic workforce reportedly irritated guests and frequently broke down.

Think about the moment when you first enter your hotel room. Look around: Does the room tell you anything unique about the hotel where you are staying? Or is it all beige walls and double beds with white covers, and you have to walk back outside and look at the sign on the hotel’s facade to even remember where you are?



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How Millennial Expectations are Transforming the Hospitality Industry

04/27/2016

Hospitality Upgrade recently had the chance to interview Ray Carlin, vice president of solution and strategy management at Oracle Hospitality, about the key findings in Oracle’s new report, Millennials and Hospitality: The Redefinition of Service.

The report surveyed more than 9,000 millennials from around the world and discussed their use of technology in hotels, restaurants, bars and coffee shops – quantifying the impact mobile devices have on the hospitality industry. Millennials are projected to spend an average of $3,900 each on travel this year.

“It’s not a shock that millennials are interested in using mobile technology, but the reality is it’s a mixed-use environment,” Carlin said. “But for some people, mobile is a personal definition of good service.”

Some key findings of the study:

  • 52 percent of millennials want to manage loyalty on their mobile devices.
  • Millennials want to use this mobile technology but on some level still want personal service and individual customer preference.
  • 39 percent of millennials have already ordered food via a mobile device, while more than half (51 percent) want to be able to order delivery and takeout from mobile.
  • 29 percent of U.S. millennials have already paid for food and drink by mobile device.
  • Millennials want to use mobile technology for hotel services such as connecting to hotel Wi-Fi, checking in to a hotel, booking a room or browsing a hotel website. Out of those surveyed, 46 percent had booked a hotel room using a mobile device, and more than 80 percent said they used a mobile device to connect to the hotel Wi-Fi.
  • There are potential ancillary markets to this group including connecting to room service and accessing entertainment. In the survey, 55 percent of millennials said they wanted to connect their mobile devices in hotel rooms to enjoy entertainment, and 36 percent of millennials said they wanted to be able to access their own entertainment and have the option of paying for music, films and TV programming.

“This study reinforces the need to provide solutions in an adaptive service model,” Carlin said. “It also validates an investment in cloud services and a focus on mobile enabling guest and employee-facing technology. It was an important effort for Oracle meant to communicate how cloud and mobile are inherent on how people want to be served before, during and after the visit.”

To read the full study please click here to sign up for the whitepaper section on our website.

About The Author
Geneva Rinehart and Katherine Darsie

Hospitality Upgrade


 
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