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With the news cycle laser-focused on the looming threat of a COVID-19 second wave happening in nearly every territory, it is up to each and every hotel to ensure we are all fully compliant with virus safety guidelines in order to restore group booking confidence. And the only way to ensure compliance with these safety guidelines is through contactless and compliance technologies to give guests a strong guarantee of proper sanitization as well as peace of mind.

A great deal has been written over the years about the viability of moving a hotel’s property-management system (PMS) to the cloud to take advantage of the latest technologies, but hoteliers need to realize that it’s not the only viable option. All platforms have advantages, including self-hosted, private cloud and on-premise solutions that leverage the latest mobile, contact free and web-based technologies. Independent operators can still enhance the digital guest experience, support personalized and mobile check-in, deploy contact free technologies, and secure hotel/guest data even if their PMS does not reside in the cloud. It should not be a question of “Cloud or On Premise?” but rather “Does the PMS solve your business objectives in both technology and service?”

Much has been written in the mainstream hospitality press about the challenges COVID-19 has presented to the industry. Hotels are in more pain than at any time in our memories. Because of the extensive media coverage, I won’t dwell on this topic further in what is primarily a technology column. But it’s the background for this week’s column, and so merits acknowledgement.

Are You All In?
Posted: 07/27/2020

Imagine everyone in your organization engaged, aligned, and performing to their potential. Imagine everyone playing “All In.”

Great organizations have synergy. Their culture allows them to play to a rhythm at a different tempo than the average organization. How do you get that at your organization?

Many front-line hospitality workers rely on tips for a significant part of their paychecks. If not for tips, many hotel associates who serve as waitstaff, bartenders, housekeepers, bell staff, concierges and pool attendants would soon be looking for other jobs. This is a regional issue: in most of Asia and Europe, staff get higher base pay, and tips are either not expected at all, or are truly discretionary. But in the U.S., Canada, Britain and other countries, tips are an important reality, and one that’s not likely to change anytime soon.



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How Millennial Expectations are Transforming the Hospitality Industry

04/27/2016
by Geneva Rinehart and Katherine Darsie

Hospitality Upgrade recently had the chance to interview Ray Carlin, vice president of solution and strategy management at Oracle Hospitality, about the key findings in Oracle’s new report, Millennials and Hospitality: The Redefinition of Service.

The report surveyed more than 9,000 millennials from around the world and discussed their use of technology in hotels, restaurants, bars and coffee shops – quantifying the impact mobile devices have on the hospitality industry. Millennials are projected to spend an average of $3,900 each on travel this year.

“It’s not a shock that millennials are interested in using mobile technology, but the reality is it’s a mixed-use environment,” Carlin said. “But for some people, mobile is a personal definition of good service.”

Some key findings of the study:

  • 52 percent of millennials want to manage loyalty on their mobile devices.
  • Millennials want to use this mobile technology but on some level still want personal service and individual customer preference.
  • 39 percent of millennials have already ordered food via a mobile device, while more than half (51 percent) want to be able to order delivery and takeout from mobile.
  • 29 percent of U.S. millennials have already paid for food and drink by mobile device.
  • Millennials want to use mobile technology for hotel services such as connecting to hotel Wi-Fi, checking in to a hotel, booking a room or browsing a hotel website. Out of those surveyed, 46 percent had booked a hotel room using a mobile device, and more than 80 percent said they used a mobile device to connect to the hotel Wi-Fi.
  • There are potential ancillary markets to this group including connecting to room service and accessing entertainment. In the survey, 55 percent of millennials said they wanted to connect their mobile devices in hotel rooms to enjoy entertainment, and 36 percent of millennials said they wanted to be able to access their own entertainment and have the option of paying for music, films and TV programming.

“This study reinforces the need to provide solutions in an adaptive service model,” Carlin said. “It also validates an investment in cloud services and a focus on mobile enabling guest and employee-facing technology. It was an important effort for Oracle meant to communicate how cloud and mobile are inherent on how people want to be served before, during and after the visit.”

To read the full study please click here to sign up for the whitepaper section on our website.

About The Author
Geneva Rinehart and Katherine Darsie

Hospitality Upgrade


 
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