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Enterprise System Pitfalls: Summary
Today I’m wrapping up a series of posts on the broad topic of Enterprise System Pitfalls. In this series, my hope was to help shed light on the primary problems that cause us to miss budgets, fall short on capabilities, or completely fail when implementing an enterprise system. 

The Year in Review
 
As 2019 comes to a close, it’s time to count our blessings. One of mine has been the privilege (and fun!) of being able to reach out to so many interesting companies and get them to tell me what they’re doing that’s different, disruptive, and game-changing. The list of things I have to write about in future columns has only gotten longer in the nine months since I started writing this column.

Sustainable Innovation
 
Sustainability can yield multiple benefits to hotels. Saving energy and water yields direct cost savings. Revenue can be generated by guests who prefer to deal with businesses that minimize their environmental impact. And many would argue that conserving scarce resources is simply the right thing to do.

Meetings Innovation
 
The sale and delivery of groups and meetings is perhaps the most significant and under-automated functions for many hotels. Even though groups often account for 30% to 60% of revenue, most group bookings are still handled manually for most if not all of steps, as they move from a meeting planner’s research to a confirmed booking.

The biggest enemy to any system is complexity. In a system of inputs and outputs, such as an enterprise system, more complexity means more parts are used in interaction with inputs to create the outputs. Every part that must be built and maintained costs time and money



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The Difference Between a Community and a Team

02/18/2015
by Renie Cavallari

In technology, it is essential that teams collaborate effectively. Communication standards must be in place with projects divided up and deadlines set, and everyone must deliver on their expected results or else the entire workflow gets jammed. In the midst of a complicated project, it can be easy to forget that a single organization is made up of many teams — all essential and all working to deliver different elements adding up to a whole.

Teams are groups of people who work together to deliver a specific function, service or product for the organization at large. Teams require specific skills for members to be effective. The operations team manages day-to-day business operations and processes. The customer service team resolves and decreases customer complaints. The sales team delivers the customer experience to create raving fans and loyalty, deliver your message, and grow relationships and revenues. Together, these teams form one community. And to be effective, that community must collaborate effectively.

Communities are groups of people who work together in service of a higher purpose. They have a distinct culture and the strength of their culture fuels positivity and productivity. Communities are built through the alignment of teams, like pieces of code coming together to form a single program. They are interactive, require participation, are dependent on their members, and equal more than the sum of their parts. When one member is in need, the entire community will reach out to support them. Communities are built on common strengths and they leverage those strengths to deliver on a shared mission.  
 

Communities are:

Teams are:

  • Committed to a higher purpose (vision)
  • Driven by a common mission
  • Sustained by the alignment of teams toward a shared culture
  • Discipline-based
  • Tactical in nature
  • Focused on specific tasks or deliverables

 

Over the last 25 years, I have had the privilege to work with hundreds of organizations and study those who consistently outperform their competition regardless of economic conditions. These outstanding organizations start by aligning their community with a strong and healthy culture.

They make sure their people don’t just understand the organization’s higher purpose —they also learn how to deliver on it and actively contribute toward it. They learn about how the organization works, why they do what they do, and how their work is meaningful to the goals and aspirations of the organization at large.

The lesson: While the nature of the work itself can be isolating, all too often IT departments are cut off from the rest of the organization. Leaders in IT must work especially hard to learn how their teams fit into the community at large, and help their people see the role they play in bringing the entire organization’s culture to life.

About The Author
Renie Cavallari
Chief Instigating Officer
Aspire Marketing


Renie Cavallari is the chief instigating officer with Aspire Marketing. She can be reached at renie@aspiremarketing.com.

 
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