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Think about the moment when you first enter your hotel room. Look around: Does the room tell you anything unique about the hotel where you are staying? Or is it all beige walls and double beds with white covers, and you have to walk back outside and look at the sign on the hotel’s facade to even remember where you are?

Hotel guests commonly bring multiple devices with them during their stay. However, many hotel environments don’t provide easy access to charging outlets. This situation can lead to a guest feeling more than inconvenienced. A recent survey found almost 90 percent of people "felt panic" when their phone battery dropped to 20 percent or below.

Spam is one of the major problems that most hotel website owners face on regular basis. It is a bad practice used by spammers to persuade the page rank of a site.

GBTA recently partnered with AccorHotels to conduct a study investigating the role of loyalty in managed travel programs in Europe with the goal of understanding how loyalty programs currently fit within company travel policy and what opportunities may exist in the future.

People today expect to be connected always and everywhere; sometimes it’s hard to believe that there was a world before smartphones and Wi-Fi. In the time since Wi-Fi became ubiquitous in hotels, apartments, and public spaces, it has fueled the evolution of connectivity in a lot of ways. Just like Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, the most basic needs start at the bottom, and you can’t get to the next level without a strong foundation. 



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Hershey Park Investigating Card Fraud Pattern: Security Expert Comment

07/28/2015

School’s out, and countless families are preparing to visit attractions like amusement parks and resort hotels. We’ve seen plenty of evidence that cybercriminals will attack all types of businesses, and those that process payment data are especially valuable. The recent investigation by popular vacation destination Hershey Park into a pattern of credit card fraud further emphasizes this. Therefore, it’s essential that hospitality companies take the necessary steps to protect customer data and ensure that stronger security measures are in place for their network, payment systems and on-premise Wi-Fi services. Making those areas a priority now will allow them to keep their visitors’ information safe and secure throughout the busy summer travel season.

Here are six common mistakes hospitality and retail companies frequently make that can increase their risk for credit card breaches:

1. Failure to Protect Incoming Internet Traffic: The first step in stealing data is finding an avenue into the targeted business. All of a business’ data circuits and its Internet connections must be protected by a robust and adaptable firewall; protecting the business from unwanted incoming traffic.
 
2. Lack of Control Over Outbound Internet Traffic: In addition to blocking unwanted traffic from getting into a location, it is always a good practice to selectively block outgoing traffic as well. Many modern breaches involve software that becomes resident on the network and then tries to send sensitive data to the hacker’s system via the Internet. No system can completely prevent unwanted malware or viruses, so a good last line of defense is making sure secure data doesn’t leave the network without the network admin’s knowledge. The same firewall used in step one should be configured to monitor outgoing traffic as well as incoming.
 
3. Failure to Adequately Protect On-Premise Wi-Fi: As people and devices are more connected to the Internet, customers will expect that they will have access to wireless communication while they are in your business. However, wireless networks can potentially expose sensitive data from your systems, especially if you are using wireless in a retail environment. A security strategy is needed to configure devices to meet operational goals, but also protect the business at the same time.
 
4. Failure to Use Two-Factor Authentication: When permitting remote access to a network, it is essential that this access is restricted and secure. At a minimum, access should only be granted to individual (not shared) user accounts using two-factor authentication and strong credentials. Remote access activities should also be logged so that an audit trail is available.
 
5. Not Updating Anti-Malware Software: It is critical to keep all anti-virus /anti-malware software up to date with the latest versions and definitions.  The companies that make anti-malware software monitor threats constantly and regularly update their packages to include preventive measures and improvements to thwart malware seen in other attacks.
 
6. Failure to Patch all Operating Systems as Security Enhancements are Released: Much like anti-virus /anti-malware updates, designers of operating systems are constantly improving their software to prevent hackers from stealing data, especially if a criminal manages to bypass the built-in security.  It is essential that the latest security releases and patches be installed on all systems. 
Almost every major breach in the last 24 months failed to incorporate at least one of these measures. As breach attacks intensify, no business is immune from increasingly sophisticated cybercriminals who see them as lucrative targets or the weak link into an even more strategic target. That explains why there’s a growing trend for hospitality businesses to choose outsource network and on-premise Wi-Fi security services, taking the burden off their hands and allowing them to focus on the core business of providing customers with exceptional dining, lodging event and travel experiences.
About The Author
Kevin Watson
CEO
Netsurion


Kevin Watson is the CEO of Netsurion.

 
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