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Enterprise System Pitfalls: Summary
Today I’m wrapping up a series of posts on the broad topic of Enterprise System Pitfalls. In this series, my hope was to help shed light on the primary problems that cause us to miss budgets, fall short on capabilities, or completely fail when implementing an enterprise system. 

The Year in Review
 
As 2019 comes to a close, it’s time to count our blessings. One of mine has been the privilege (and fun!) of being able to reach out to so many interesting companies and get them to tell me what they’re doing that’s different, disruptive, and game-changing. The list of things I have to write about in future columns has only gotten longer in the nine months since I started writing this column.

Sustainable Innovation
 
Sustainability can yield multiple benefits to hotels. Saving energy and water yields direct cost savings. Revenue can be generated by guests who prefer to deal with businesses that minimize their environmental impact. And many would argue that conserving scarce resources is simply the right thing to do.

Meetings Innovation
 
The sale and delivery of groups and meetings is perhaps the most significant and under-automated functions for many hotels. Even though groups often account for 30% to 60% of revenue, most group bookings are still handled manually for most if not all of steps, as they move from a meeting planner’s research to a confirmed booking.

The biggest enemy to any system is complexity. In a system of inputs and outputs, such as an enterprise system, more complexity means more parts are used in interaction with inputs to create the outputs. Every part that must be built and maintained costs time and money



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Buzzword of the Week: Mobile Check-In

06/24/2015
by Dan Phillips

Comments on this year's HITEC:
 
The big get bigger!  There have been several mergers this last year, and a couple more rumored.  That makes for fewer companies for hotels to choose products and services from.  While many hotel companies and brands strive for standardization, several of them hope to differentiate themselves.  It is important that many new companies, with different ways of doing things, continue to enter our industry.

It appears that many companies are trying to become everything to everybody.  Where once there was just a PMS company, now they have include CRM and messaging and service request tracking and on and on.  In some respects this is good, cuts down on integration issues and costs.  In other respects, we may be losing differentiators that more strategically align with specific types of hotels.

At HITEC last year the theme seemed to be BYOD/BYOC with the TV and STB players.  That theme carried over to this year in that many vendors have solved that issue.  This year seemed to center around door locks and mobility.  It seems that most everyone is talking about using mobile phones to enter guestrooms.  This is still in early stages and many facets of this, not the least of which include operational challenges at the hotel during the check-in process, have to be figured out.  One might assume that by next year’s HITEC, this technology will be easier to employ.

Springing off of the door locks and mobility are continuing conversations around hotel mobile apps.  It seems like most every hotel brand has an app, and many individual hotels have apps as well.  One could say that our industry has over saturated consumers with hotel apps that do very little by way of value or service to our guests.  As hoteliers, and suppliers too, we need to search for better, more relevant, value-enhancing apps from which more hotel services can be launched.  Maybe vendors touted the guest life cycle but showed very little unique and sticky applications within that framework.

It seemed that there were more exhibitors than previous years; the show seemed much bigger.  HFTP is an organization made up of hoteliers and vendors.  I believe that hoteliers that are HFTP members have an obligation to attend HITEC, participate in both the educational and social events, and walk the show floor meeting with as many exhibitors as possible.  Yes, they are trying to sell something, and some are more pushy than others, but there is a lot to be learned by meeting with as many vendors as possible.

About The Author
Dan Phillips
Owner
Dare to Imagine


Dan Phillips is the owner of the consulting firm, Dare to Imagine (www.dare2i.com). He started behind the front desk of a Holiday Inn in 1987 and has been consulting to hotel companies since 1991. Dare to Imagine enlists hotel experts with decades of C-level experience at many of the major hotel companies in the world. He can be reached at dphillips@dare2i.com or by phone at 678-852-5913.

 
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