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A groundbreaking new report by the Urban Land Institute in Washington, D.C. explores sustainability in the hospitality industry and examines ways in which hotels are incorporating eco-friendly best practices into both operations and construction. The study includes insights from leading hotel owners, developers and investors.

Every hotel owner wants to know how he can increase the traffic to the website, and at the same time, boost direct bookings. The key to accomplish both the objectives is to design a site that is accessible even to disabled people. It will not only improve the usability for all types of visitors, but it will also improve your market penetration. Designing ADA website is also very imperative to prevent legitimate complications. In addition to this, an ADA feature will aid in improving the website performance in search engines.

The underappreciated city of Minneapolis served as host for the 2019 edition of HITEC (produced by HFTP) which wrapped up its most recent four-day run on June 20, 2019. In the days and weeks leading up to the event, meeting solicitations and party invites filled my inbox at a growth rate any VC or entrepreneur would envy. As a first-timer to this international hospitality technology behemoth, it became apparent that HITEC actually begins a few weeks prior to when that first request or invitation lands in your over-stuffed inbox.

Time is limited. Once it’s gone, you can’t gain it back. Similarly, once a room goes unsold for a night, it will go unsold forever. There’s no way to recover that loss, because there’s no way to go back in time.
 
Many hotels fight this limitation by trying to sell as many rooms as possible. If all the rooms are completely booked, time no longer becomes a factor. But most don’t have the luxury of being at-capacity every single night. That’s why last-minute booking apps are growing in popularity in the industry, where hotels can make the most of each day. These apps specifically target guests who don’t plan far in advance, seeking accommodations from one week to one minute later.
 
There are several different ways your hotel can benefit from using last-minute booking apps in your business strategy.

IoT is Coming, Jon Snow…
Posted: 05/21/2019

Hospitality is prime for the coming advent of the various devices that make up the Internet of Things. Estimates show the industry now represents 17.5 million rooms worldwide and savvy guests are demanding more personalization and an overall improved guest experience along their connected travel journey and belief is that IoT can bring this to reality. 



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Forging New Guest Connections

05/20/2014
As connected, mobile, always-on travelers become the norm, hotels and other travel providers are increasingly using wireless communications to improve services, to enhance guest satisfaction – and to drive bottom-line business performance.

Guests, staff, and partners now carry a dazzling array of mobile devices. Wireless networks are more ubiquitous. Machine-to-machine (M2M) software applications are driving a growing number of everyday transactions and guest service activities. To fully appreciate the importance of IT and networked communications, consider how a highly-connected Millennial now expect to interact with a hospitality provider.

Web-based technology often comes into play before a room is booked, when tech-savvy consumers consults social media to assess brands or shop properties. Premier loyalty members, for example, typically book a stay via the hotelier’s own website or through a discount booking channel. 

Once they reach the property, advanced capabilities allow premier members to bypass the check-in process and go directly to their room. Near-field communications (NFC) technologies are used to send hotel room key, along with welcome messages and other details, directly to a guest’s mobile device. 

A virtual concierge service may be displayed, with personalized information addressing the loyalty member’s unique preferences. The hotel may also offer an augmented reality capability that allows the guest to view hotel amenities, local attractions, and nearby services. Properties are also using these technologies to deliver coordinated loyalty program and partner affinity offers to guests before, during, and after their visit. 

Leveraging past history, forward-looking hotels recognize a premium guest, and automatically set the room’s temperature control to the guest’s specifications. If there is an issue with the climate control, maintenance is automatically notified to address the issue, and if the issue cannot be resolved quickly, the guest is automatically re-assigned to a new room. 

Those same systems can be used to stock the mini bar and pre-configure the in-room television to suit the member’s preferences. The connected property provides robust business services, including convenient cloud-based access to personal and work information – so travelers can stay connected and productive while on the move. 

Busy travelers can then check out from the room or from their smartphone. Checkout is fully automated, and once checkout is confirmed, housekeeping is notified.

Next-gen technologies also simplify the billing process. Bills can be forwarded via email or to a mobile phone, and for business travelers invoices can be forwarded to corporate travel expense accounting, along with the details needed to support managed corporate travel. 

By fully leveraging the Internet of Things, hospitality firms can streamline operations, drive innovation, and deliver a more customized, satisfying guest experience.

About The Author
Eric Harte
Vice President, Travel and Transportation Industry
HP Enterprise Services


 
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