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Time is limited. Once it’s gone, you can’t gain it back. Similarly, once a room goes unsold for a night, it will go unsold forever. There’s no way to recover that loss, because there’s no way to go back in time.
 
Many hotels fight this limitation by trying to sell as many rooms as possible. If all the rooms are completely booked, time no longer becomes a factor. But most don’t have the luxury of being at-capacity every single night. That’s why last-minute booking apps are growing in popularity in the industry, where hotels can make the most of each day. These apps specifically target guests who don’t plan far in advance, seeking accommodations from one week to one minute later.
 
There are several different ways your hotel can benefit from using last-minute booking apps in your business strategy.

IoT is Coming, Jon Snow…
Posted: 05/21/2019

Hospitality is prime for the coming advent of the various devices that make up the Internet of Things. Estimates show the industry now represents 17.5 million rooms worldwide and savvy guests are demanding more personalization and an overall improved guest experience along their connected travel journey and belief is that IoT can bring this to reality. 

The forces driving local search rankings are constantly changing. But recent studies suggest that in 2019, four key factors make up the local search algorithm. 
 
The most significant factor is Google My Business (GMB). If you’re not on it, get on it now.

The robotic revolution in the hospitality industry might seem to have taken a step back. This January, the famously quirky Henn-Na Hotel in Japan fired half of its 243 robot staff. The robotic workforce reportedly irritated guests and frequently broke down.

Think about the moment when you first enter your hotel room. Look around: Does the room tell you anything unique about the hotel where you are staying? Or is it all beige walls and double beds with white covers, and you have to walk back outside and look at the sign on the hotel’s facade to even remember where you are?



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Adapting to the Changing Landscape of Group Demand Measurement; Part 1 of 3

09/19/2014

The hotel industry had a record setting year in 2013: It was the year of most rooms sold, highest rooms revenue, highest ADR, and highest RevPAR.  2014 is shaping up to be even better: Occupancy is projected to grow between 2.1 percent to 2.6 percent, and ADR is forecasted to grow between 4.2 percent and 4.5 percent.  In fact, in the United States, May 2014 RevPAR growth was a new record breaking 10 percent.
 
It has been well-documented that the stellar U.S. performance has been driven by the increase in the transient segment, but we are also finally seeing growth in group demand.  For example, the number of group rooms sold in June 2014 was 1.5 million more rooms than what was sold last June of 2013.  Exemplified in the table below, group occupancy growth is finally outpacing the growth of transient occupancy.  However, group ADR growth is only at 1.5 percent compared to the 4.2 percent growth of transient ADR. 

 

YTD 2014: Top 25 North American Markets

   

 

YOY Growth

Segment

Occupancy

ADR

Group

3.70%

1.50%

Transient

3.10%

4.20%

Source: Travelclick
 
With all of these positive indicators (record breaking performance, consistent demand increases, moderate supply growth and four years of positive RevPAR lift), why aren’t we seeing better growth in group ADR? Certainly some of this lack of growth can be attributed to group business booked between 2008 and 2010, the Great Recession.  However, the Recession cannot explain it all.  Let’s examine a bit more closely some contributing factors.

The most obvious reason for the lack of growth is the change in group dynamics: Meetings are getting smaller and shorter.  Back in 2005, group business represented about 39 percent of occupancy, and currently in 2014, it represents only 33 percent of the occupancy.  Another issue is the 12-month moving average of group demand change was in negative territory during the second half of 2013 through early 2014. This may have led some hotels to reduce group prices to be lower than what the market could probably have held.  These factors, and more, have made the group landscape more competitive. 
 
While there are various reasons for group ADR underperformance, let’s focus on how individual properties currently measure their group demand, the changes to group distribution, and then ultimately, the downstream impact on how they price group.

As noted earlier, until recently, group occupancy and group pace have been lackluster in the United States.  I can certainly empathize with the revenue management team during the group rate quotation process when the group pace has not been as strong as needed. At the same time, we have to recognize that most markets have already reached or surpassed previous peak occupancies.  Many markets have likely already hit their functional capacity with little to no space for additional occupancy growth.  For RevPAR growth to remain positive in the future, growth has to come in the form of ADR lift.  The prognosticators in our industry are all projecting 2015 RevPAR increases between 5.2 percent and 6.7 percent, with occupancy only contributing about 1 percent growth. 

Assuming that the transient ADR lift continues at the current pace of about 4.2 percent, transient rate growth will have to be even higher in 2015. More importantly, group ADR has to rise dramatically compared to the current growth rate of 1.5 percent to hit the overall RevPAR projections.
So how do we make this ADR lift happen?  In my next blog post, we are going to examine what is going on with measuring group demand and how you might be looking at it incorrectly. All of which could be leading to pricing decisions resulting in money left on the table.
About The Author
Erik Browning
Vice President of Business Consulting
The Rainmaker Group


Erik Browning is the vice president of business consulting with THE RAINMAKER GROUP. With 15 years of revenue management experience across a wide range of hotels in multiple destinations, including 10 years with Hilton Worldwide, Erik understands the hotelier perspective to help meet business objectives.

 

 
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